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  • Dengue outbreak affects at least 22 in Japan

    A worker sprays insecticide at Yoyogi Park, believed to be the source of a dengue fever outbreak, on August 28, 2014An outbreak of dengue fever in Japan -- the first since World War II -- has affected at least 22 people, the government said Monday, with all cases believed to be linked to a Tokyo park. The health ministry said 19 new infections have been confirmed since last week. All are believed to have visited Tokyo's Yoyogi Park or its environs, one of the major green lungs of the metropolis, popular with residents and tourists alike. The park, one of the largest open spaces in central Tokyo, is believed to be the source of the mosquito-borne disease.


  • Judge temporarily blocks law that could close all Louisiana abortion clinics

    Louisiana Governor Jindal speaks at the Family Leadership Summit in AmesThe measure, signed into law by Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal in June and due to take effect Sept. 1, would require doctors who perform abortions to have patient admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of their practice. "Plaintiffs will be allowed to operate lawfully while continuing their efforts to obtain privileges," Federal Judge John deGravelles wrote in the decision. Abortion rights activists applauded the decision, the latest in a string of rulings against similar measures, saying it would give doctors more time to seek hospital privileges. "Today’s ruling ensures Louisiana women are safe from an underhanded law that seeks to strip them of their health and rights," said Nancy Northup, president and chief executive of the Center for Reproductive Rights, which sued to block the law on behalf of three of the state's five clinics.


  • Dozens arrested at Made in America music festival in Los Angeles

    Revellers lounge on the lawn in between acts at the Made in America festival in Philadelphia(Reuters) - Seven people were arrested on Sunday at the Made in America music festival in downtown Los Angeles, following an opening day that left more than two dozen people in handcuffs, police said. During Sunday's show at Grand Park there were four felony arrests, including one for battery and the rest for possession of narcotics, besides three misdemeanor arrests, including one charge of public drunkenness, the Los Angeles Police Department said. Another 23 people were given alcohol citations, an LAPD police spokeswoman said. So far about 27,000 tickets have been scanned for Sunday's full day of events, including top-billed stars John Mayer and Kanye West later in the evening.


  • Health workers death toll mounts in W.Africa as Ebola spreads

    The front view of the Samstel Clinic and Maternity Centre owned by Dr Ikyke Samuel Enuemo, who died of the Ebola virus, in Port Harcout, August 29, 2014Nigeria's health minister will hold an emergency meeting of state health commissioners on Monday as West Africa struggles to halt the deadly Ebola virus, amid growing concern at the toll among healthcare workers. Nigeria on Sunday confirmed a fresh case of Ebola in a doctor whose husband died from the virus, adding to a growing list of those providing healthcare in West Africa to be hit by the epidemic. The woman's husband was also a doctor who died in the city of Port Harcourt on August 22 after treating a patient who had contact with the Liberian man who brought the virus to Nigeria in late July. She was in a stable condition at an isolation unit in the financial capital, Lagos, said Sampson Parker, the health commissioner of Rivers State, of which Port Harcourt is the capital.


  • New test fast-tracks diagnosis for malaria

    A new invention can cheaply and accurately diagnose malaria infection in just a few minutes using only a droplet of blood, researchers have reported in the journal Nature MedicineA new invention can cheaply and accurately diagnose malaria infection in just a few minutes using only a droplet of blood, researchers have reported in the journal Nature Medicine. The tool could replace the laborious, error-prone method by which a lab technician looks for malaria parasites in blood through a microscope, they said. While that method is considered the gold standard in malaria diagnostics today, it depends on the technician's skill in interpreting the image, the quality of the microscope and lab chemicals and even on the thickness of the blood smear on the slide itself. The touted replacement is an "inexpensive" desk-top mini-lab that, according to its inventors, can detect fewer than 10 malaria parasites per microlitre of blood, using a sample of less than 10 microlitres -- equivalent to a small drop from a finger prick.


  • Swedish hospital investigating possible case of Ebola: media

    A hospital in the Swedish capital is investigating a possible case of Ebola, Swedish media reported on Sunday. A man who recently traveled to a "risk area" for the virus was taken to Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm suffering from a fever and is being treated in an isolation unit, the reports said. More than 1,500 people have died in an Ebola outbreak in West Africa since March. "The virus isn't airborne and can only be spread between people through direct contact with blood and other body fluids," daily Svenska Dagbladet wrote, quoting a statement by the Stockholm County Council.

  • Four members of suburban Chicago family found shot to death

    By Mary Wisniewski CHICAGO (Reuters) - Four members of a suburban Chicago family were found shot dead in their home, with one death ruled a suicide and the rest homicides, police and coroner officials said on Sunday. Local media said the victims were an elderly couple and their two severely disabled adult children. Police said they were investigating the incident in Elmhurst, about 18 miles west of Chicago, but there was no threat or danger to others. The four bodies were discovered Saturday evening after Elmhurst police went to the home for a "well being check," police said.

  • WHO: Senegal Ebola case 'a top priority emergency'

    In this photo taken on Friday, Aug. 29, 2014, a security guard, center left, working at the University Hospital Fann, speaks to people inside a car, as a man is treated for symptoms of the Ebola virus inside the Hospital in Dakar, Senegal. The effort to contain Ebola in Senegal is “a top priority emergency,” the World Health Organization said Sunday, as the government continued tracing everyone who came in contact with a Guinean student who has tested positive for the deadly disease in the capital, Dakar. (AP Photo/Jane Hahn)DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — The effort to contain Ebola in Senegal is "a top priority emergency," the World Health Organization said Sunday, as the government continued tracing everyone who came in contact with a Guinean student who has tested positive for the deadly disease in the capital, Dakar.


  • Sweden discovers suspected case of Ebola: official

    Health care workers wearing protective suits work at the Elwa hospital, where Ebola patients are treated, on August 30, 2014 in Monrovia, LiberiaA suspected case of the Ebola virus has been discovered in the Swedish capital Stockholm, a local official told AFP on Sunday. Aake Oertsqvist, a specialist in infection control responsible for the Stockholm area, was quoted as saying the risk of an Ebola outbreak in Sweden was "very low".


  • Gene clues to glaucoma risk

    Scientists say they have identified six genetic variants linked to glaucoma, a discovery that should help earlier diagnosis and better treatmentScientists on Sunday said they had identified six genetic variants linked to glaucoma, a discovery that should help earlier diagnosis and better treatment for this often-debilitating eye disease. The flaws came to light in a minute trawl through the genome of tens of thousands of people in more than half a dozen countries, comparing the DNA of those with glaucoma against those who were otherwise healthy. Glaucoma -- the leading cause of irreversible eye disease in the world -- is caused by damage to the optical nerve, usually by a buildup of fluid pressure in the eyeball. Further work on exactly how faulty genes cause glaucoma could also lead to better treatments, the scientists said.