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  • BOJ shocks markets with more easing as inflation slows

    Bank of Japan Governor Kuroda walks into a news conference at the BOJ headquarters in TokyoBy Leika Kihara and Tetsushi Kajimoto TOKYO (Reuters) - The Bank of Japan surprised global financial markets on Friday by expanding its massive stimulus spending in a stark admission that economic growth and inflation have not picked up as much as expected after a sales tax hike in April. The jolt from the BOJ, which had been expected to maintain its level of asset purchases, came as the government signaled its readiness to ramp up spending to boost the economy and as the government pension fund, the world's largest, was set to increase purchases of domestic and foreign stocks. ...


  • India considers ban on e-cigarettes, sale of single smokes

    By Aditya Kalra NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India is considering a ban on electronic cigarettes over the risks to public health that they may cause, a senior Health Ministry official told Reuters. The World Health Organization (WHO) in August called for stiff regulation of e-cigarettes as well as bans on indoor use, in the latest bid to control the booming $3 billion global market. Such devices use battery-powered cartridges to produce a nicotine-laced vapor but there is a lack of long-term scientific research that confirms they are safe. ...

  • A look at Ebola guidelines in some states

    States have broad authority to quarantine people to prevent the spread of disease, and several are exercising that right to go beyond the safety recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control for containing the deadly Ebola virus.

  • JAL worried about potential impact of Ebola on travel market

    TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan Airlines Co Ltd CEO Yoshiharu Ueki on Friday expressed worry about the potential impact of the Ebola outbreak on the travel market. "I'm very concerned, the potential impact could be great," he said at an earnings briefing. (Reporting by Tim Kelly; Editing by Chris Gallagher)

  • To stop Ebola's spread in West Africa, target funerals: study

    Volunteers lower a corpse, which is prepared with safe burial practices, into a grave in KailahunBy Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - As the global health community ramps up its efforts to treat Ebola patients and curb its spread in West Africa, a new analysis finds that the greatest impact would come from insuring safe burials for victims, scientists reported on Thursday. The need for safe burials has been known from the beginning of the epidemic last spring, when people who attended the funeral of a faith healer in Guinea became infected. U.S. ...


  • APNewsBreak: Medicare bought meds for dead people

    FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2014 file photo, Medicaid Administrator Marilyn Tavenner testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. A government watchdog agency says Medicare’s prescription drug program kept paying for costly medications even after patients were dead. The problem seems to have started with a bureaucratic rule now getting a second look. A report coming out Friday from the Health and Human Services inspector general says Medicare has been allowing payment for prescriptions filled up to 32 days after a patient’s death. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it drugs for the departed: Medicare's prescription program kept paying for costly medications even after patients were dead.


  • Soldier or civilian, Ebola protocols not the same

    Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel speaks during a briefing at the Pentagon, Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014. Hagel ordered military men and women helping fight Ebola to undergo 21-day quarantines that start upon their return _ instead of their last exposure to an Ebola patient. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. soldier returning from an Ebola response mission in West Africa would have to spend 21 days being monitored, isolated in a military facility away from family and the broader population. A returning civilian doctor or nurse who directly treated Ebola patients? Depends.


  • Fighting likely to surge in South Sudan as rainy season ends - report

    By Alex Whiting LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The end of the rainy season is imminent and warring parties in South Sudan's civil war are preparing for major offensives likely to cause fresh displacement and hunger, the think-tank International Crisis Group said in a report. President Salva Kiir's government forces and rebels allied to his former deputy Riek Machar have been fighting since December 2013, despite ongoing peace talks in Addis Ababa and several ceasefire agreements. A growing number of militias and self-defence forces are joining the conflict. ...

  • Life goes on for nurse in standoff over Ebola

    Nurse Kaci Hickox, right, and her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur are followed by a Maine State Trooper as they ride bikes on a trail near her home in Fort Kent, Maine, Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014. The couple went on an hour-long ride. State officials are going to court to keep Hickox in quarantine for the remainder of the 21-day incubation period for Ebola that ends on Nov. 10. Police are monitoring her, but can't detain her without a court order signed by a judge. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)FORT KENT, Maine (AP) — In between going on a bike ride and taking delivery of a pizza, nurse Kaci Hickox and her boyfriend did chores and watched a movie while state officials struggled to reach a compromise in a standoff that has become the nation's most closely watched clash between personal freedom and fear of Ebola.


  • New Zealand's Fonterra says China lifts ban on baby formula ingredients

    WELLINGTON (Reuters) - New Zealand's Fonterra Co-Operative Group, the world's biggest dairy exporter, said the Chinese government has lifted a ban on the last two products that were embroiled in last year's contaminated infant formula scare. It said the ban on New Zealand producers exporting whey powder and base powder containing whey for infant formula to China has ended. The ban was imposed in August last year in the wake of the scare that whey powder had been contaminated with a bacteria that could cause botulism. ...