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  • USDA overhauls decades-old poultry inspections

    FILE - This Aug. 24, 2010 file photo shows chickens in Sparks, Md. The Obama administration is overhauling poultry plant inspections for the first time in more than 50 years, a move it says could result in 5,000 fewer foodborne illnesses each year. The final rules announced Thursday would reduce the number of government poultry inspectors by around a fourth. But those that remain will focus more on food safety than quality, requiring them to pull more birds off the line for closer inspections and encouraging more testing for pathogens. There would also be more inspectors checking the facilities to make sure they are clean. (AP Photo/Rob Carr, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is overhauling poultry plant inspections for the first time in more than 50 years, a move it says could result in 5,000 fewer foodborne illnesses each year.


  • Ebola patient coming to U.S. as aid workers' health worsens

    Handout photo of Dr. Kent Brantly speaking with colleagues at the case management center on the campus of ELWA Hospital in MonroviaBy Julie Steenhuysen and Colleen Jenkins CHICAGO/WINSTON-SALEM N.C. (Reuters) - A U.S. aid worker who was infected with the deadly Ebola virus while working in West Africa will be flown to the United States to be treated in a high-security ward at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, hospital officials said on Thursday. The aid worker, whose name has not been released, will be moved in the next several days to a special isolation unit at Emory. The unit was set up in collaboration with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Reynolds said the CDC is not aware of any Ebola patient ever being treated in the United States, but five people in the past decade have entered the United States with either Lassa Fever or Marburg Fever, hemorrhagic fevers similar to Ebola.


  • Poor Sanitation: The Startling Link to Childhood Malnutrition

    Poor Sanitation: The Startling Link to Childhood MalnutritionI just returned from a trip to India, where I was teaching at the Delhi Indian Institute of Technology, interacting with an eager group of future environmental scientists and engineers. As we discussed water pollution, a July 13 New York Times article reported on an emerging hypothesis that poor sanitation in India may be more responsible than...


  • Y Combinator-Backed ListRunner Eliminates Hospital Paperwork

    Y Combinator-Backed ListRunner Eliminates Hospital PaperworkA majority of a doctor’s time is spent jotting down notes about a patient for the next doctor on duty  over and over again with a pen and paper, according to Dr. Jeeshan Chowdury. His new Y Combinator-backed startup, ListRunner, promises to eliminate this paperwork with a mobile app.You’d think this problem would have already been...


  • U.S. reforms poultry inspections to boost food safety

    By Ros Krasny WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced on Thursday reforms to decades-old processes for inspecting poultry facilities in a bid to cut down on the number of foodborne illnesses, but dropped an industry-backed plan to speed up production. The move could prevent as many as 5,000 foodborne illnesses each year, USDA officials said. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said the plan "imposes stricter requirements on the poultry industry and places our trained inspectors where they can better ensure food is being processed safely." The agriculture department said maximum line speeds for chicken and turkey processing plants operated by companies such as Tyson Foods, Pilgrim's Pride, Sanderson Farms and Foster Farms would remain capped at 140 birds per minute "in response to public comment." Tom Brown, president of the National Chicken Council, said not allowing faster speeds meant "that politics have trumped sound science." A successful U.S. pilot program had been conducted with plants operating at 175 birds per minute, and broiler plants in several other countries "operate at line speeds of 200 or more birds per minute," Brown said.

  • Watch: Inside an Airport Quarantine Station

    ABC News' Dr. Richard Besser the CDC Quarantine Station at Newark Airport in New Jersey.

  • Watch: How an Airport Quarantine Station Works

    ABC News' Dr. Richard Besser the CDC Quarantine Station at Newark Airport in New Jersey.

  • U.S. warns against traveling to Ebola-hit countries

    U.S. health officials are warning Americans not to travel to the three African countries hit by an outbreak of Ebola.

  • U.S. Senate Republicans block $2.7 billion border security bill

    U.S. Senate legislation giving President Barack Obama $2.7 billion to deal with tens of thousands of Central American migrant children amassing at the southwestern U.S. border was blocked on Thursday by Republican opposition. Earlier on Thursday, the House of Representatives failed to pass a $659 million funding bill that the White House had threatened to veto.

  • U.S. government seeking to test Ebola vaccine on humans: reports

    LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The U.S. government will begin testing on people an experimental Ebola vaccine as early as September, after seeing positive results from tests on primates, according to media reports on Thursday. The National Institutes of Health's infectious disease unit is working with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to put the vaccine into trial as quickly as possible, according to CNN and USA Today. The director of that unit could not be reached for comment. (Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis; Editing by Sandra Maler)