95 WXTK News Radio Masthead Image

Howie Carr

3pm-7pm

 

Listen Live
95 wxtk facebook 95 wxtk twitter

 

  • Democrats' draft platform calls for reviews of trade deals

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Democratic Party's 2016 policy platform calls for reviews of trade deals, wider health coverage through public programs such as Medicare, and federal investigations of fossil fuel companies accused of misleading shareholders on climate change, according to a draft version released on Friday. The committee drafting the platform last weekend approved the document, which spells out the party's policy priorities. It still must be formally adopted at the Democratic National Convention, to be held in Philadelphia in July. ...

  • Aetna launches Medicare Advantage asset sale: sources

    A trader points up at a display on the floor of the New York Stock ExchangeMerging Aetna's and Humana's Medicare Advantage businesses would make the combined company the largest U.S. manager of the healthcare insurance for seniors and the disabled. Aetna has sent out pitchbooks to potential buyers and will begin collecting bids as soon as next week, the people said on Friday.


  • Girls less likely to get pregnant if a friend has a baby

    By Linda Thrasybule (Reuters Health) - - Girls whose friends have experienced teen childbirth are less likely to get pregnant themselves, a new study suggests. In 2000-2001 - the fifth year after the start of the study - girls whose friends had given birth had about 25 fewer sexual intercourse encounters, on average, than girls whose friends had miscarried.

  • J&J's Janssen hit with $70 million verdict in Risperdal trial: lawyers

    The jury in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas found that the company failed to warn the boy's healthcare providers about the risk of gynecomastia and that it intentionally falsified, destroyed or concealed evidence in the case, according to a copy of the verdict form provided by a spokesman for the law firm Arnold & Itkin.

  • Many everyday common chemicals are endangering child brain development says new report

    Many everyday common chemicals are endangering child brain development says new reportA new report published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives is calling for more attention to be paid to the growing evidence that exposure to many everyday common chemicals are causing harm to children's brain development. Dozens of scientists, health practitioners and children's health advocates have expressed their concern in the paper that these chemicals are disrupting brain development from as early as pregnancy with the effect continuing through to children of all ages.


  • Guinea-Bissau confirms three cases of Zika virus, government says

    Guinea-Bissau has confirmed its first three cases of the Zika virus in a group of islands off the mainland and has set up an emergency committee to stop further transmission of the disease, the government said on Friday. Experts have feared the tiny nation could become a gateway for Zika's spread to mainland West Africa, after an outbreak of the mosquito-borne virus was first recorded in the African island chain of Cape Verde late last year. "The Health Minister has informed (the government) of three confirmed cases of Zika virus contamination located in the Bijagos Archipelago," read a government statement sent to reporters.

  • Spain records first case of sexually transmitted Zika virus

    Photo illustration shows an anti Zika virus kitSpain has recorded its first known case of the Zika virus being sexually transmitted, after a woman contracted it from her partner after he returned from a Latin American country, health authorities in Madrid said on Friday. The mosquito-borne Zika virus has been linked to thousands of cases of the microcephaly birth defect in countries such as Brazil, which has declared a public health emergency over the disease. The birth defect is marked by babies born with brain abnormalities and undersized heads.


  • Obama urges Congress to release Zika funds

    US President Barack Obama speaks about the response and precautions to take for the Zika virus, during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, July 1, 2016US President Barack Obama urged Congress Friday to advance $1.9 billion in emergency funds to fight the Zika virus, saying Republicans should set aside politics to tackle the fast-moving disease. "This is not the time to play politics," Obama said in remarks delivered in the White House Oval Office following a meeting with National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases chief Anthony Fauci and other officials. "Congress should not leave, should not adjourn, until they get this done," he added ahead of the Independence Day holiday weekend.


  • UK drugs regulator to halt approvals for Indian clinical trials firm

    By Zeba Siddiqui MUMBAI (Reuters) - The UK's healthcare regulator has decided to suspended marketing approval for a widely used antibiotic that had won clearance based on clinical trials conducted by India's Quest Life Sciences, due to concerns over the integrity of trial data. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) might also deny other pending drug approval requests that rely on studies conducted by Quest, the UK agency said in a letter dated June 22, a copy of which was seen by Reuters. The MHRA's decision bars the sale of a generic version of erythromycin that is being sold in the UK by Dawa Ltd, a Kenyan drugmaker, an MHRA spokesman said.

  • People eat less when wearing ‘bite counters’

    By Madeline Kennedy People who wear “bite counters” on their wrists while eating tend to cut down on how much they consume during a meal, a study suggests. Several years ago, Eric Muth and colleagues at Clemson University in South Carolina developed a way to track how much people eat based on their wrist motion. Muth told Reuters Health by email that self-monitoring is vital when trying to meet health goals.