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  • Celladon says heart treatment fails in trial

    Celladon Corp said its heart failure gene therapy Mydicar failed to meet its primary and secondary endpoints in an important trial. "We are surprised and very disappointed that Mydicar failed to meet the endpoints in the CUPID2 trial, and we are rigorously analyzing the data in an attempt to better understand the observed outcome," Celladon's chief executive, Krisztina Zsebo, said in a statement on Sunday. According to the company, the gene therapy failed to show a significant treatment effect when compared to placebo.

  • National Guard called up to deliver water in Minnesota bird flu fight

    By P.J. Huffstutter CHICAGO (Reuters) - The Minnesota State Emergency Operations Center has called on the National Guard to deliver water for use in the effort to contain the rapidly spreading avian flu virus, the center said on Sunday. Starting Monday, 30 National Guard soldiers and 15 military water trucks from the Willmar, Minnesota-based 682nd Engineer Battalion and the Brooklyn Park-based A Company, 134th Brigade Support Battalion will be used, the center said in a statement. The National Guard became available to be activated for such efforts last week, after Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton declared a state of emergency over the spread of the strain of avian flu, which has lead to the extermination of more than 7.3 million birds in the United States so far. Minnesota's action followed a similar move by neighboring Wisconsin a few days earlier.

  • Soccer-Chelsea's Oscar taken to hospital after collision in derby

    Chelsea's Brazil playmaker Oscar was taken to hospital after being clattered by Arsenal goalkeeper David Ospina during the 0-0 Premier League draw at the Emirates on Sunday. Oscar was played in by Cesc Fabregas in the 16th minute of the London derby and after dinking the ball over the outrushing Ospina he was flattened, appearing to be struck on the head. Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho refused to criticise referee Michael Oliver for not giving a penalty.

  • Foreign countries, aid agencies race to reach Nepal quake victims

    By Nita Bhalla NEW DELHI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - International agencies and governments rushed on Sunday to send search and rescue teams, doctors and medicines to Nepal where an earthquake has killed more than 2,400 people and left tens of thousands without food, water or shelter. Teams from India, Pakistan, the United States, China and Israel were already on the spot to help, said the United Nations, as overwhelmed rescuers dug with their hands through the rubble to look for thousands still missing. Other international search teams have or are scheduled to arrive in the capital Kathmandu, with units from Japan, the United States and Britain equipped with sniffer dogs and equipment for heavy lifting. "The priority remains saving lives and immediate search and rescue ongoing," said a report from the office of the U.N. Resident Coordinator in Nepal.

  • Quake overwhelms Nepal's weak healthcare system

    By Rupam Jain Nair KATHMANDU (Reuters) - A massive earthquake in Nepal has exposed the woeful state of its medical facilities as hospitals struggle to treat vast numbers of injured with limited supplies and staff. The country of 28 million has only 2.1 physicians and 50 hospital beds for every 10,000 people, according to a 2011 World Health Organization report. The situation is worsening a humanitarian crisis triggered by Nepal's worst earthquake in 81 years. So far many of the seriously injured in Kathmandu were being referred to Bir Hospital's Trauma Centre, which opened in February this year with 200 beds.

  • IMF ready to send team to Nepal to assess needs

    The International Monetary Fund said on Sunday it was ready to send a team to Nepal to evaluate financial needs after the earthquake that killed more than 2,400 people and devastated Kathmandu valley. "An IMF team stands ready to visit Nepal at short notice to help the government assess the macroeconomic situation and determine any financing needs," managing director Christine Lagarde said in a statement. The IMF is coordinating with the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank to evaluate the impact from Saturday's quake of 7.9 magnitude, which toppled buildings in the capital Kathmandu and triggered avalanches on Mount Everest. Overwhelmed doctors moved hundreds of patients onto the streets of Kathmandu on Sunday when aftershocks rattled hospitals and buildings.

  • In Kathmandu Valley, quake-hit Nepalis fend for themselves

    By Ross Adkin DHADING, Nepal (Reuters) - Barely any sign of an organized relief effort was visible outside Nepal's capital on Sunday, as aid agencies struggled to fly and truck relief supplies to a country stricken by its worst earthquake in eight decades. In the lush Dhading farming district 80 km (50 miles) outside Kathmandu, people camped in the open, the hospital was overflowing, the power was off and shops were closed. Many people have died," said English teacher Chandra Lama, whose home village lies two hours' drive further west. "We are waiting to see what the government will do." More than 1,100 people - or half of the total confirmed dead in Nepal - were in the Kathmandu Valley, a crossroads of the ancient civilizations of Asia and economic hub of the Himalayan nation of 28 million.

  • Oklahoma lethal injection drug faces U.S. Supreme Court test

    A police officer walks up the steps of the Supreme Court in WashingtonThe U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments this week on whether a drug used in Oklahoma's lethal injection mix should be banned in a case that comes as a shortage of execution chemicals has sent some states scrambling for alternatives. The main question before the nine justices in the case brought by three death row inmates that will be heard on Wednesday is whether the use of the sedative midazolam violates constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment. The case does not address the constitutionality of the death penalty in general, but brings fresh attention to the debate over whether executions should continue in the United States. Opponents say midazolam is not approved for use in painful surgeries and should not be used in the death chamber because it cannot maintain a coma-like unconsciousness, potentially leaving inmates in intense pain from lethal injection drugs that halt breathing and stop the heart.


  • How to Be Happy in a World of Turmoil

    How to Be Happy in a World of TurmoilHow many times have you thought to yourself the following: If only I had more money, if only I had someone to love, if only I had a better job, if only I felt better. If only I had that one thing I am missing, I would be happy.Truth be told, following that reasoning you will never attain real happiness. Actually, the opposite effect would...


  • Get Off the Scale!

    It's seems that once again, the public conversation about health has been degraded to weight and appearance.As usual, celebrity women have become the prime targets of jabbing and sometimes devastating comments. This collective social behavior always trickles into the day-to-day lives and consciousness of so many women, fueling insecurity,...